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difference to us. it is just really helpful. when we come in here, it is under pressure. also, the out -- may not get beyond a few people. the notification and so on. so i really look forward to this. commissioner wu: thank you. any further public comment? seeing none, public comment is closed. commissioner miguel: i would like to compliment joanna nad claudio -- and claudia for the work you have done so far. i have had some engagement over the last year's with the department. i conducted two noontime forums for them on basically answering questions, and they seemed very receptive and understood the principles that were involved. what i have a slight problem with is not your power point presentation -- although, please do not read slides word for word. i am finding in one section community stakeholders. then i am seeing residents and businesses. then public. then department stakeholders. by the way, stakeholders never divide. i think you are talking about the same people, but you are using all different terms, and that does not make sense to me. then i see under the statement of purpose down
a few people like that. broke and then rehab us certain amount of censorship to not get through the numbers of the dead on either side so i would be quite critical but i am a generalizing and some have done an incredible job covering problems of the middle east and as an example of someone who was a splendid reporter in the region. >>host: have you written about four previously? >> i have never written about compact the way had here and this is a new subject and it took me many, many interviews what is a way to be a woman soldier in combat and why do do it? then i found out more. >>host: the author of this book "the lonely soldier" the private war of women serving in iraq" also the author of the novel based on the same research. helen benedict from colombia university. >>host: niara please to be joined by jonathan leader who has won the national book critics circle award. his most recent is long for this world. who was aubrey? >> aubrey de gray became a computer scientist to develop the idea we might live in essentially forever zero were 10,000 years. and the more time i spent w
, it is something that we have talked about. it is important for us to understand what the cbos are doing. it is important for them to have specific training for their individuals. they should also have some guidelines and some criteria to evaluate their successes, on a quarterly and yearly basis. >> thank you. last question. what are the types of job opportunities that are available for at risk youth? what are the funding opportunities? >> there are not many job opportunities right now. with the way that funding is currently, it is only being reduced. what we try to do is think creative. we try to create an internship programs, where we try to confuse -- infuse youth. we utilize a lot of non-western ways of trying to have youth identified. we infuse political education so they can make a good choice. there are other programs like oasis. there are not many opportunities, not everybody could work -- all the work permits required. it also requires a social security number. alternative pathways are a good way to go, such as those internship opportunities. use these venues as an opportunity t
. it is important for us to understand what the cbos are doing. it is important for them to have specific training for their individuals. they should also have some guidelines and some criteria to evaluate their successes, on a quarterly and yearly basis. >> thank you. last question. what are the types of job opportunities that are available for at risk youth? what are the funding opportunities? >> there are not many job opportunities right now. with the way that funding is currently, it is only being reduced. what we try to do is think creative. we try to create an internship programs, where we try to confuse -- infuse youth. we utilize a lot of non-western ways of trying to have youth identified. we infuse political education so they can make a good choice. there are other programs like oasis. there are not many opportunities, not everybody could work -- all the work permits required. it also requires a social security number. alternative pathways are a good way to go, such as those internship opportunities. use these venues as an opportunity to have kids reflect and make positive choices by lea
. it is a good idea, it is something that we have talked about. it is important for us to understand what the cbos are doing. it is important for them to have specific training for their individuals. they should also have some guidelines and some criteria to evaluate their successes, on a quarterly and yearly basis. >> thank you. last question. what are the types of job opportunities that are available for at risk youth? what are the funding opportunities? >> there are not many job opportunities right now. with the way that funding is currently, it is only being reduced. what we try to do is think creative. we try to create an internship programs, where we try to confuse -- infuse youth. we utilize a lot of non-western ways of trying to have youth identified. we infuse political education so they can make a good choice. there are other programs like oasis. there are not many opportunities, not everybody could work -- all the work permits required. it also requires a social security number. alternative pathways are a good way to go, such as those internship opportunities. use these venues
on their recommendations, their findings, and uses they recommend. in the plan we recommended it were top priority buildings, we wanted them kept and saved. now we are coming forward with what the private sector sees as vital uses, how we can move forward. this will also initiate a process of public comment. are these the right uses, activities? a way to remind in this part of pier 70. the third initiative is the crane cove park initiative. you had an update on that in the june meeting. we will be learning more. we hope in 2014 to be running a new park. we will have this building up and running and will be well on our way to bring up the rest of the site. so with that, i want to introduce eddie orton and his team. >> good afternoon. thanks for having us. first, i would like to thank the courport staff members for r dispatch and vigorous this in pursuing this deal. a brief reminder, we are in development. -- orton development. we have to take one second to find a slide show. >> well you are looking for it, does that match and that that we are given? >> yes. that slide that just won by is really our
statewide primaries. you include the u.s. senate, the governor, and those races. >> we use the primary only as an example. there is nowhere else i use the primary information in our report for -- i never looked out over votes in primaries at all. it just looks at primary's in general about 65% of winner- take-all. i could not use september's election if i wanted to keep that formats until i had november's numbers. >> if you think about it with a plurality election, if you compare everyone who votes for the top two, their ballots counted in the final round. everyone else who did not voted for those top two, it is similar to where their ballots has exhausted. it is this ironic thing that everyone is picking out exhausted ballots in making a deal at of its and not realizing that all races have exhausted balance. the people whose votes did not go to one of the top two the only have one choice. if you are going to into an analysis, which you only do in the appendix, it makes sense to extend that to other races. you will see these numbers are far higher than they are in contests.
christs and we have a capitol strike going on. u.s. treasuriers saying we are parking 50 percent of the debt in u.s. backings. isn't that poor of problem. >> we hear the bad news and it makes us nervous . victoria hit the fact on the nose. two percent of the gdp comes from the sales. slow down yes, recession highly unlikely. what does worry me. u.s. banks have far more exposure to the european front than we are told. it is a credit crunch we could do without. >> i think mike hasn't heard the news yet. the u.s. housing market bottomed on tuesday . more good news, because costs are low in the u.s. we are bringing manufacturing back to the u.s.. there is a 50-50 chance we'll repeal obama care. >> not a chance. >> greece is about the size of connecticut and maybe it will not affect the u.s. economy. if our banks had taken the time to shore up the balance sheet. you think what matters most is washington d.c. policy. who is going to be elected president is going to matter a lot . what is happening in congress is a big wild card here . europe, i am not as worried about europe. i agree w
. >> an to calcutta, india. sex workers are barred from entering u.s. and holding alternative conference. we will take a look at the aids epidemic in black america and speak with congress member barbara lee of california. >> we need to make some noise. we need to put eradicating hiv and aids at the front burner of our political agenda, both here and abroad. >> all that and more coming up. this is "democracy now!," democracynow.org, the war and peace report. i'm amy goodman. syrian troops continue to bombard the city of aleppo in a bid to reclaim areas held by rebel forces. there have been reports of syrian helicopters backed by fighter jets firing from above, forcing hundreds of residents to flee. and allepo resident said syrian forces had fired indiscriminately, killing civilians. >> two brothers and their uncles were killed, another is between life and death. tend shells on a daily basis and this village has not had any sign of armed groups. we are targeted only because we call for freedom. >> speaking in washington, secretary state clinton said of killing of syrian president bashar al-assad is inev
toolimit using yoor stove or oven... and take a cool shower... that'll make the peoole arounn you happier too. morning news. it's been a eek since powerful storms swept through region...leavvng behinn fallen debris, damage...and causing thousands to go without power. as oo riiht now, b-g-e say they've restored power to almost 700-thousand people.but manyyare will without power, morning.herres a look at the latest power outageenumbers at this hhur:according to b-g-e's website... total...anne aruudel county...baltimore ciiy... baltimore county... ccrroll county... howard county... 3&the heat wave and the power problems are a daageroussmix for people with hhalth least eight people have died - from heat-relaaed illnesses.... phree of them in baltimore city its especially pifficult foo those with respirattry problems. 3 and kinda wheezing like. i've got a wheezing tting. that lets me know its time to get on to my machine." machine." been without powwr for six as - use hee breathing device. crees bbgan workinggin hee catonnville neighborhoodd thursddy afternoon.. but, soo far... n
that joe's human. he's not the godly saint that some of us made him out to be, including myself. >> reporter: tonight a family spokesman issued a statement saying, joe paterno wasn't perfect. he made mistakes and he regretted them. meanwhile, lawyers for curley and schultz criticized the freeh report, calling it a lopsided document based on an incomplete report. brian? >> mike isikoff, state college, pa, tonight. thanks. >>> bob costas of nbc sports is already at our olympic headquarters in london preparing to host the olympic coverage on nbc. bob, the big question, i guess, is, what does this do to penn state, the program, the school, the brand, the aura of the nittany lions? >> well, the aura, the reputation, that's already been badly tarnished. i think even the most staunch loyalists realize something that can't be rationalized away occurred here. and then outside penn state, the reputation of the university has taken a very, very serious hit. the ncaa has a term that it sometimes uses when punishing schools for violations in their athletic departments, lack of institutional
is viewed everywhere else but here. europe's troubles will give us a reprieve, but they won't solve our problems. that's why leadership is so important, and -- and let me step aside for a minute. all the republican candidates in the primary i knew. i knew them well, from newt gingrich, to ron paul, to tim pawlenty, to rick santorum, and as a conservative i endorsed mitt romney. and as a physician i want to tell you why. the problem in our country isn't that we don't have solutions. the problem in our country is that we don't have leadership, bold leadership that will teach and taught to the american public as adults and then lead on those principles, and if you go look at the life of mitt romney, at every juncture, at every intersection, at every challenge in his life and in his professional career he has demonstrated the qualities of leadership that i want for my children and grandchildren. [ applause ] and i would just have you contrast that with what we have today in the white house. the other thing i would have you think about in terms of the problems in front of us is the contrast
person or a white person. it is about all of us, or none of us, and that is the bottom line. it has to be that mentality. >> it is a way to control the prisoners. it takes the pressure off the guards and everybody else. they say we want to stop violence, but you promote a violence by segregating. when an individual comes, the first in the asking, where are you from? what is your nationality? that is how to divide and conquer. that is the way the united states is made up. that is how you work. north and south vietnam, for instance. they divide people so that the pressure will not be on them. that is how i see the system. i see it in prison, how they divide inmates. it is scary if inmates unite, and they do not like that. when i first come to prison, it will be a big thing if i went and sat with the blacks. it would be a big think if they caucasian sat with the asians. we only did that one time, where everybody got together, and we got what we wanted. when you unite, you can conquer. [applause] >> next question is for the commander. how can they community-based organization contact th
with a black person or a white person. it is about all of us, or none of us, and that is the bottom line. it has to be that mentality. >> it is a way to control the prisoners. it takes the pressure off the guards and everybody else. they say we want to stop violence, but you promote a violence by segregating. when an individual comes, the first in the asking, where are you from? what is your nationality? that is how to divide and conquer. that is the way the united states is made up. that is how you work. north and south vietnam, for instance. they divide people so that the pressure will not be on them. that is how i see the system. i see it in prison, how they divide inmates. it is scary if inmates unite, and they do not like that. when i first come to prison, it will be a big thing if i went and sat with the blacks. it would be a big think if they caucasian sat with the asians. we only did that one time, where everybody got together, and we got what we wanted. when you unite, you can conquer. [applause] >> next question is for the commander. how can they community-based organization co
to give us back is what they have already taken away from us. i will remind everybody they took over $20 million. it was $2 billion this year, $2.20 billion. that is about $20 million for us. they took away that last summer. we are not even getting any of this faq. when people say we are going to pass this and it is going to help us, it will help us better than none, but we have been basically in deficit, all the school districts. they are not making up the money they have already taken away from us. i wish i would share the optimism for the good things. having said that, we are still going to negotiate with our collective bargaining partners. we always have. we did in the last two years. obviously, the integration of having back those school days is paramount for all of us, because it is unfair to students and our employees. each day is about a half percent decrease in a much they earn. that is not fair. why should they be carrying the burden of this crisis alone? those are things that are critical to us. if moneys come available, of course that is something we are going to try to get g
to get a little bit of information between today and tomorrow. another issue -- you use 2006 information as opposed the most recent data we have, which is 2009. by that, you under-inflated some of the traffic impact numbers. it appears the traffic modeling you did was done -- frankly -- it was manipulated to help you arrive s.a. -- are right that a certain result. the data you received is frankly just not believable. i'm wondering if anybody could respond to that in a way that could help me understand this in time for tomorrow's hearing? >> i understand what you are asking and i am confident in the analysis we performed an would be more happy to drill down on some of the numbers you are citing a particular intersection. right in front of me and would have to double check. supervisor chiu: today, this hearing was supposed to drill down on these issues and that's why i'm asking these questions. get supervisor campos: -- supervisor campos: if i could follow up on that, wondering why your definition of significant impact is? >> that a very good question. when an intersection goes from the ex
. in minnesota, they use september elections in odd years. it seems to me including those is comparing apples to apples. in terms of the state primary, all i was suggesting was using the most recent 2012 data because you are already using state primary. you already have said in the report. it stopped at 2010. including 2012, it would make sense. it is the most recent data. you already have a category for statewide primaries. you include the u.s. senate, the governor, and those races. >> we use the primary only as an example. there is nowhere else i use the primary information in our report for -- i never looked out over votes in primaries at all. it just looks at primary's in general about 65% of winner- take-all. i could not use september's election if i wanted to keep that formats until i had november's numbers. >> if you think about it with a plurality election, if you compare everyone who votes for the top two, their ballots counted in the final round. everyone else who did not voted for those top two, it is similar to where their ballots has exhausted. it is this ironic thing that everyo
because i wanted us to be more about a scenario like san francisco, where it is separated completely from everything else. as far as the primary, i was only looking at november of general elections. if you want me to look at the primaries, that would require me to go look at every other primary prior to that. there is a different type of voter turnout, so there is a little bit of a difference there. i do not think it ties -- over votes would be important for education purposes. i am not sure it is exactly there. but if the commission wishes to, i to do that. there was a comment about first and last round information. i did not want to make a decision. there were people coming at me from about sides. -- both sides. i inc. first-round and final round to allow people to compare the two. i did not want to get in the middle of that discussion. supervisor campos: anything else? >> i understand there were some comments made about how you looked at over votes or how many ballots being cast. i did get an e-mail about some of the concerns. i did look through all of those. they are not needed for th
that's not a lot of people came and helped us. the police department, teachers and family came to support us. >> we shall them as a community we support them. >> there surpassed their goal of $1,000. could what ought cu >>vicki: people protested outside the hyatt hotel. >>da: it was allowed, heated and passionate demonstrations. some workers accused this hotel of abuse in employees and paying below average wages. >> the tree like an animal. >> maria lopez has worked here for about five years and claims management mistreated her what she was pregnant. caught the wants of for a unit of this hotel. bill tush general manager says the accusations are not shoot -- are not true. >> we treat our employees with the highest respect. [ male announcer ] it would be easy for u.s. olympian meb keflezighi to deposit checks at the nearest citibank branch. ♪ like this one. ♪ or this one. ♪ or, maybe this one. ♪ but when it's this easy to use citibank mobile check deposit at home...why would he? ♪ woooo! [ male announcer ] citibank mobile check deposit. easier banking. every ste
-- as clear as you can, whatever president to help us figure out whether option one or two is the right way to go. >> [inaudible] >> you can make that argument. i understand. ok. beyond that, i think there would be open if you wanted to argue other issues in briefing but that is the primary one. how many pages do you think you need to make that point? >> that particular point? >> yes. >> you with the abstract -- you want the abstract, not the fact of the case? >> here is what else i was envisioning. it would be helpful if we had 30 minutes -- closing arguments to tie together for us so in the briefing i do not think we need to see it. if you want to brief it, i would not object if you agree. but what i need briefing on is this option. option one or option two. are their options the commissioner would like -- commissioners would like briefing on? >> i would be interested in two particular points on the same issue. if you could brief any legislative history on the charter amendment that included the second prong. that would be interested -- i would be interested in seeing. and whether you thi
you mentioned, and what if you tell us though name of your firm. one of the things that was mentioned is they coordinate with the other engineering and design people and the construction firm, and one of the major problems with these kinds of construction projects is coordination, making sure that everybody is building the same building and everything fits together right. in large measure, that is the architect's job. do you make sure that the structural stuff fits together, with the architecture and the mechanical? >> that is where we earn most of our money. >> that is difficult? >> no question, we had cahill come on board at the later stages of design to help with the construction, details, flexing of systems, that sort of thing. >> we're fortunate today to have john with us, who was a soil engineer. one of the design teams, one of the original first persons to be looking at this project is the soil engineer. they look at where the building will be built, what is the soil like, and how we make the building hit the ground. people say, you go down to bedrock. are we going down to bedr
, a lot of people would have wondered why seniors would want to use computers, but that has shifted. over the next few years, as all of us move toward being seniors, we will not be wanting technology. we will be demanding it. the field is going to change, and more and more people are going to be here. so the ability to make technology accessible is there. those of us charged with doing this have a really important role. we have to be able to provide the tools for the technology in ways that the people can hear. i am happy to be your speaking with you because i think this is an incredibly important topic. this afternoon, there is a workshop on addressing multiple barriers for accessing technology, and it will be a brainstorming session where someone from my office and a couple of other people will be leading a discussion of what issues people run into and how you deal with them. i think it is a really important topic and i think it is probably one of the most important things people could be talking about now. for all of us, technology is here and going to be here, and we all need it. than
of communications technology that the target was using that whether by wire, cable, or satellite transmission. the result was a carve out from the court approval for surveillances that targeted communications made from overseas locations. with the change in technology over the intervening years since 1978, that carve out has started to break down and the government found itself expending significant manpower generating applications for surveillances against persons outside the united states. as a result the government was unnecessarily expanding resources and increasingly forced to make tough choices regarding surveillance of targets. to the enduring credit, they recognized that this was untenable in a post-9/11 world and after a year of careful consideration, it passed the faa. first it authorized the fisa court to improve categories of non-u.s. persons intelligence targets overseas without providing the government to provide an individualized application that brought the operation of pfizer back in line with the original intent. second it established a system of oversight by the fisa court
if you tell us though name of your firm. one of the things that was mentioned is they coordinate with the other engineering and design people and the construction firm, and one of the major problems with these kinds of construction projects is coordination, making sure that everybody is building the same building and everything fits together right. in large measure, that is the architect's job. do you make sure that the structural stuff fits together, with the architecture and the mechanical? >> that is where we earn most of our money. >> that is difficult? >> no question, we had cahill come on board at the later stages of design to help with the construction, details, flexing of systems, that sort of thing. >> we're fortunate today to have john with us, who was a soil engineer. one of the design teams, one of the original first persons to be looking at this project is the soil engineer. they look at where the building will be built, what is the soil like, and how we make the building hit the ground. people say, you go down to bedrock. are we going down to bedrock? is there bad r
who still don't have those benefits. but for those of us who are lucky right now, we are living 10 years, 20 years more than our ancestors did. now the question is can you study aging head-on, and can you do something about the deterioration of the 50s, 60s, 70s and on up? can we do anything about that that would give us another 20 or 30 or 40 years or more? by story's main character, aubrey de grey, rights to argue that if we can only extend life a little faster than we do now, medicine will keep advancing. faster than our own deterioration, and will essentially live forever. >> host: the century between the 20th and the, i'm sorry, the 19th and 20th century. what was the life expectancy? forty years? >> guest: turn of the 20th century i think it was 47 or 48 years. average life expectancy in the u.s. now we are up to about the 80s. an anonymous gain in just the last century. >> host: how do we get to 1000? [laughter] >> guest: before we talk about how to get to 1000 years, but there are two questions here. there is can we and there is should we. can we and what we really want to?
inside. it was -- imagine, it was such a tense situation for all of us. our life was at risk, but what women did, we decided that we are going to continue to stay in the jerga because it was for three three days. we took the risk and we didn't know what was going to happen next, the second day, the third day and we had to actually face the challenge of actually fighting with our families. >> i was going say -- >> because my mother was telling me, don't go, you are going to kill yourself. don't go, but i think peace is so important for all of us, but we are contributing in afghanistan. we are already working very hard and, yes, we are risking our lives and we are proud of what we are doing. thank you very much. >> and you've also been able to get women into these major conferences, too. >> right. >> is it hard for them when they go back home from these conferences? are families proud or is there some retribution? do they get criticized when they go back? >> at first from family to family in afghanistan because culturally i always use the word diverse -- we are so much diverse.
been terrific in helping us to resolve the end -- electrical problems. i also want to mention that there was an item before the board of supervisors today, an ordinance to retroactively approved the emergency situation and our ability to enter into those contracts with consultants. i wanted to thank the board for their support. they all helped out with questionnaires and were engaged and involved. i was there at 11:00 to watch the robot. there was a huge crowd. the technology involved to make sure everyone was safe was terrific. the cruise terminal project is not only on schedule, but the last piece will be placed by next tuesday. we are very, very pleased by the responsiveness of all parties involved and the ability to, hopefully, preserve that part of our history and future. blacks do we know the cause of the fire? >> the fire department is investigating and is expected to have a report out in about three weeks. it should be out any time. whites two short questions. those are diesel generators? are those relatively new? my understanding with different generators is that some
. that is 5%. supervisor campos: how did you arrive at that definition? >> that preceded me and has been used by the city for a very long time. supervisor campos: i'm wondering if i can hear from the transportation focus on whether or not that is the definition of significance that the city is going by? >> those significance thresholds are set by the planning department. we think they are reasonable. supervisor campos: we talked earlier about this assumption that 40% of trips would happen on public transit. we heard that it seemed a blow. if the assumption was higher -- that seem low. >> if you used a .e assumption of people driving, you would read do the analysis and get a larger volume of vehicular traffic as a result the project. supervisor campos: we also heard from president chiu that the passenger data was 2006 data and we have data from 2009 available. if the data upon which this finding was based was 2009 date as opposed to 2006 data, do you think it would have impacted the outcome? >> i can't answer that right now. supervisor campos: is it possible? >> it is certainly possible. >> if
thanks for having us. first, i would like to thank the courport staff members for r dispatch and vigorous this in pursuing this deal. a brief reminder, we are in development. -- orton development. we have to take one second to find a slide show. >> well you are looking for it, does that match and that that we are given? >> yes. that slide that just won by is really our cover. we are on the second page. again, you selected us and we feel very privileged to be selected. because of our experience with similar projects. we specialize in large scale of this industrial rehabilitation. we have been fortunate to earn the confidence of some of our country's leading innovators. we are going to keep the project update -- give you a project update. we have perfected the our lease of the noted building and have opened up our offsite office. we have completed an access agreement which has allowed us to understand the premises. we have completed our negotiation agreement, which of course, allows us to proceed with the term sheet and lease. we're in the middle of our listening tour where we
. a request before you today is for conditional use authorization for formula retail use for poppa john's pizza. there's been no expansion of the existing tenants space. -- if i could ask for just a moment, please >> sorry for the interruption. it will go ahead and continue. this is a request for a formula retail at 696 center street. the restaurant will offer pizza and other food primarily for delivery and carry out. there is no expansion of the tenet space with respect to the form -- the retail uses, we ask the planning commission considers several criteria including the existing concentration of formula retail usage in the area, the availability of other similar business types and a vacancy rates in that district. staff performed a survey within five blocks of the project site and found there are 15 existing an approved formula retail uses , 15 establishments that sell pizza, including two formula retail restaurants and 14 vacant storefronts. it should be noted within six blocks of the site, there are 25 pizza restaurants. this area is intensely developed and highly residential. ther
should be dedicated and i don't know how any of us can say with the proper number of children to be medicated would be. how many hundreds of thousands would be the right number. i just hope that in so far as kids are getting this care that it's done in a sensitive way, and in a way that is as productive and helpful for their long-term development as possible. >> guest: there is a serious problem of abuse of occasions of stimulants that gets a lot of media attention, doesn't necessarily help in terms of understanding why kids are being prescribed medication. it does however point to the pressures that are bearing down on these kids they feel like we have to be sort of superhuman. to what extent do you think we can in white society for kids mental health problems? should we be indicting society? should we have a biological view and see these kids will be having problems no matter what? where do you come down thinking about that? .. >> yes. that is his takeover if the child is impaired not functioning as they should be to let them go on that way. >> it is fascinating. the book sh
to nature, you can use some of that money to get people and other parts of the city into golden gate park to appreciate nature for example. i urge you to look at the value of our social and human capital because sometimes it is worth more than the fish or money. >> thank you for letting me speak. i am sad because we are changing a beautiful park that i have loved for almost 50 years have i have been here. i asked you to look into your heart to and see what you're doing. i reminded of the bumper sticker that said the, what would jesus do? i would ask you what john mclaren would do. >> next speaker. >> thank you for this opportunity. i am a home owner on great highway and i have been sending e-mail's to you folks. i have never been involved in city politics and i have no idea how these decisions get made. i thought, surely, they will not allow this to happen. and it keeps on rolling and rolling. i don't know what anybody in this room can do to change the way it is moving or except in alternative, but i am a surfer, i have a financial planner. i think golden gate park is absolutely unique. t
, you can use some of that money to get people and other parts of the city into golden gate park to appreciate nature for example. i urge you to look at the value of our social and human capital because sometimes it is worth more than the fish or money. >> thank you for letting me speak. i am sad because we are changing a beautiful park that i have loved for almost 50 years have i have been here. i asked you to look into your heart to and see what you're doing. i reminded of the bumper sticker that said the, what would jesus do? i would ask you what john mclaren would do. >> next speaker. >> thank you for this opportunity. i am a home owner on great highway and i have been sending e-mail's to you folks. i have never been involved in city politics and i have no idea how these decisions get made. i thought, surely, they will not allow this to happen. and it keeps on rolling and rolling. i don't know what anybody in this room can do to change the way it is moving or except in alternative, but i am a surfer, i have a financial planner. i think golden gate park is absolutely unique. t
look at the state of that church, and i used to live between jackson and -- i cannot remember the other street, washington -- and i know that church well. i used to vote at the elementary school. i know the neighborhood well and i know about the church. it was not in this shape until more recently. i have a hard time saying, gee, we should play this game again with a developer who, by the way, this is not their first time the radio. if you want to make changes to the project to work with the neighborhood, if you have had two years, a lot of time to work on this, even before the last hearing. i find it frustrating to the commissioners time and the public at large to have to have this conversation over and again when there is a very simple thing that we have asked, actually, early on, that was not done. we're not even talking about the building and at the scale. just talking about the bare minimum at this developer is from the community, is familiar with the planning process, unusual requests have not been made. i just find it really frustrating, frankly. in terms of ceqa, it is very clea
's possible use of chemical weapons. >> brown: then, we examine the use of a one-drug lethal injection on a prisoner last night in texas-- the state that executes more convicts than any other. >> suarez: as delegates arrive in washington for an international aids conference, we have two progress reports: gwen ifill gets an update from the director of the united nations program on aids. >> brown: and we assess the epidemic here in our nation's capital, where the infection rate is the highest in the country. >> we have people who will be tested repeatedly in hopes that one of those tests will be negative so that they can say i don't have.i.v. we have people who think they can pray their h.i.v. away. >> suarez: plus, as part of his ongoing series, hari sreenivasan talks with native americans about the search for solutions to the effects of climate change on their tribal lands. >> brown: that's all ahead on tonight's "newshour." major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: and the lliam and flora hewlett foundation, working to solve social and environmental problems at home and
and talk about seniors and technology, a lot of people would have wondered why seniors would want to use computers, but that has shifted. over the next few years, as all of us move toward being seniors, we will not be wanting technology. we will be demanding it. the field is going to change, and more and more people are going to be here. so the ability to make technology accessible is there. those of us charged with doing this have a really important role. we have to be able to provide the tools for the technology in ways that the people can hear. i am happy to be your speaking with you because i think this is an incredibly important topic. this afternoon, there is a workshop on addressing multiple barriers for accessing technology, and it will be a brainstorming session where someone from my office and a couple of other people will be leading a discussion of what issues people run into and how you deal with them. i think it is a really important topic and i think it is probably one of the most important things people could be talking about now. for all of us, technology is here and goin
are part of a very successful industry that has cost us some 71,000. we have an increase in visitors from 2010. you are also helping us to change of their unemployment. we invest here to make improvements. this simple announcement is that we're going to expand this center. i can announce that we are beginning something which is really really important to buttress that expansion, that is to begin a 25-year master plan for our whole center and all the things we wanted to in conjunction with their. that is how we support our tourism industry and our hospitality industry. with that, we have the beginnings of our master plan. you know the work that i did, part of our success is doing long-term planning. we have done that with our 10- year capital infrastructure plan so that once we have completed that plan and we have allowed all of our departments to weigh in, we are doing the same thing with our 25-year master plan. we have skidmore, merrill, and -- helping us do this. by the end of this summer, they will present that master plan to us for consideration. when you plan for success, you will b
you to lead us. >> happy birthday to you happy birthday to you happy birthday, mayor lee happy birthday to you ♪ ♪ [applause] >> we would like to thank -- ed, please make a wish in blowout the candles -- and blow out the candles. [laughter] [applause] we would like to thank peter of the california culinary academy, a person here to say a few words about this beautiful cake. >> thank the. mr. mayor, on behalf of the california culinary academy, where like to wish you a happy birthday. this is made and designed by our very own pastry chefs. chefs, please come out. and one of his many students. this cake is totally edible. and we made enough that it will be able to serve 500, if the mayor cuts small little pieces. [laughter] any way, happy birthday. >> thank you very much! wonderful! >> whoo, happy birthday to mayor ed lee! we have a party in the house! thank you. and we are all going to get to have a piece. thank you. we're going to remove the cake so that it can be cut and you could each have a piece. meanwhile, we will have the finale, and we ask everybody to stand up and d
all of us, or none of us, and that is the bottom line. it has to be that mentality. >> it is a way to control the prisoners. it takes the pressure off the guards and everybody else. they say we want to stop violence, but you promote a violence by segregating. when an individual comes, the first in the asking, where are you from? what is your nationality? that is how to divide and conquer. that is the way the united states is made up. that is how you work. north and south vietnam, for instance. they divide people so that the pressure will not be on them. that is how i see the system. i see it in prison, how they divide inmates. it is scary if inmates unite, and they do not like that. when i first come to prison, it will be a big thing if i went and sat with the blacks. it would be a big think if they caucasian sat with the asians. we only did that one time, where everybody got together, and we got what we wanted. when you unite, you can conquer. [applause] >> next question is for the commander. how can they community-based organization contact the task force for speaking engagements
interest. ben shrugged. who knows. i would be with us in the second. i am serious. don't you feel abandoned. it's a three way honey, i don't think two people can feel abandoned. he might be late. i looked at the clock again. 25 minutes. only hustlers can get away with that. he's not a hustler? ben turned and looked at me. you think i bought us a hustler? how pathettic tic do you think we are? >> i sort of felt like he targeted us. i didn't get that sense. may be i'm wrong. ben smiled. you are disappointed. no , i said, no just annoyed. he pulled down the waist band. i don't need a mercy suck. he looked up. mercy suck. whatever. undeterred ben got down to business. mercy i said, there was when mr. johnson knocked on the door. you may have figured it out by now. to us, he was still the great dark man. a mythical man or object to desire. it was probably why we jumped to attention. jesus. tucking the incriminating evidence. wait. let this go down first. >> why? i don't know. seems rude. ben widened his eyes at me. did you learn that from miss manners. i hid myself. this probably made me look
, it is very likely that he will be deported and he will probably never have a chance to come back into the u.s. with the legal status. immigration law has an impact that was not like a citizen. one out of two children in california live in a household with an immigrant parents. we have about 5 million people that are not yet citizens. this includes people who are here with legal status and people who are undocumented. these are the folks who will face immigration consequences. for drug offenses, the immigration consequences are particularly harsh and they are very unforgiving. a lawful permanent resident has been here for 20 years can get deported for the most minor drug conviction of the session, under the influence, possession of paraphernalia, those can result in deportation. so much is undocumented and have u.s. citizen family members. he does not have an opportunity to become legal and a drug conviction means that he will never be able to have legal status to be here with his family. the consequence of a drug offense is that someone will be put into a mandatory detention. that means no ba
the seating. you do not just sit with a black person or a white person. it is about all of us, or none of us, and that is the bottom line. it has to be that mentality. >> it is a way to control the prisoners. it takes the pressure off the guards and everybody else. they say we want to stop violence, but you promote a violence by segregating. when an individual comes, the first in the asking, where are you from? what is your nationality? that is how to divide and conquer. that is the way the united states is made up. that is how you work. north and south vietnam, for instance. they divide people so that the pressure will not be on them. that is how i see the system. i see it in prison, how they divide inmates. it is scary if inmates unite, and they do not like that. when i first come to prison, it will be a big thing if i went and sat with the blacks. it would be a big think if they caucasian sat with the asians. we only did that one time, where everybody got together, and we got what we wanted. when you unite, you can conquer. [applause] >> next question is for the commander. how can they co
of people would have wondered why seniors would want to use computers, but that has shifted. over the next few years, as all of us move toward being seniors, we will not be wanting technology. we will be demanding it. the field is going to change, and more and more people are going to be here. so the ability to make technology accessible is there. those of us charged with doing this have a really important role. we have to be able to provide the tools for the technology in ways that the people can hear. i am happy to be your speaking with you because i think this is an incredibly important topic. this afternoon, there is a workshop on addressing multiple barriers for accessing technology, and it will be a brainstorming session where someone from my office and a couple of other people will be leading a discussion of what issues people run into and how you deal with them. i think it is a really important topic and i think it is probably one of the most important things people could be talking about now. for all of us, technology is here and going to be here, and we all need it. thank you ver
that has cost us some 71,000. we have an increase in visitors from 2010. you are also helping us to change of their unemployment. we invest here to make improvements. this simple announcement is that we're going to expand this center. i can announce that we are beginning something which is really really important to buttress that expansion, that is to begin a 25-year master plan for our whole center and all the things we wanted to in conjunction with their. that is how we support our tourism industry and our hospitality industry. with that, we have the beginnings of our master plan. you know the work that i did, part of our success is doing long-term planning. we have done that with our 10- year capital infrastructure plan so that once we have completed that plan and we have allowed all of our departments to weigh in, we are doing the same thing with our 25-year master plan. we have skidmore, merrill, and -- helping us do this. by the end of this summer, they will present that master plan to us for consideration. when you plan for success, you will be successful. that is what we have learn
of that church, and i used to live between jackson and -- i cannot remember the other street, washington -- and i know that church well. i used to vote at the elementary school. i know the neighborhood well and i know about the church. it was not in this shape until more recently. i have a hard time saying, gee, we should play this game again with a developer who, by the way, this is not their first time the radio. if you want to make changes to the project to work with the neighborhood, if you have had two years, a lot of time to work on this, even before the last hearing. i find it frustrating to the commissioners time and the public at large to have to have this conversation over and again when there is a very simple thing that we have asked, actually, early on, that was not done. we're not even talking about the building and at the scale. just talking about the bare minimum at this developer is from the community, is familiar with the planning process, unusual requests have not been made. i just find it really frustrating, frankly. in terms of ceqa, it is very clear we're not to approve a pro
of the building and go to the elevator. we used to be able to pull into the back alley. it is being contested and just open the door and there is a ramp to go to the elevator. it was a lot. for a person to deal with someone who is disabled as well as all the rest of parts of our life, it is a pain. if robert has trouble walking which his back has caused a lot of problems and walking is one of them, it is much better for him to go through the alley and there is -- the door that comes into the building there goes into the basement through a ramp. it is a sloping ramp. that would be the best way for him to go into the building if it -- if he comes to the point where he needs a wheelchair. we're sympathetic that there is a lot of problems. nobody is arguing about that. in the process of this, somehow, some other kid is set -- other considerations, i think we are being overlooked. either the gate should be removed or there should be access with keys to the gate and the gate should be opened. >> have you requested a key? >> no. we have requested a key and said -- they said they will give us a key.
, the exchanges between the governments and the companies between the two sides. as the largest economy in the u.s., california boasts the resources and a strong advantage in high tech, bio-science, agriculture, fisheries, and the forestry, and even tourism. and in terms of cooperation with china, california enjoys exceptional economic, cultural, and geographical locations and advantages. it is always is the gateway of the united states to china. as the economic and trade cooperation between china and the united states and california deepens, now we believe that trade and investment keeps growing. china is the third largest export destination for california. many multinationals like hp, intel, cisco, and chevron are doing well in china. they're making money in china. at the same time, as the close relationship is going on, many chinese companies are working in san francisco in california. i would like to name a few. the tsl, ciuts, just to name a few. these are successful chinese companies working here. as the american companies in china, the chinese companies working in california in san francisc
diligence and hard work. i will never use drugs. the chinese team is extremely strict on doping control. so i can assure you that it is not an issue with us. and women's gymnastics, the team finals happening right now. if the u.s. wins, it will be their first team gold since 1996. we'll keep you posted on that one. i want to go back to the swimming. the women's 200 meter freestyle happening in about two hours. 17-year-old american missy franklin, she is taking on the world record holder, that is fredricka pell greeny of italy. in men's swimming, michael phelps could win two medals today. first up, the 200 meter butterfly. if he pulls it off, he jumps back into the pool for the relay. if he wins both, he'll have a record 19 olympic gold medals. wow. zain has the best assignment ever. wish i was there. missy franklin this young american swimmer. there is a lot to her story and some of it involves a little embarrassment for nbc as well. tell us what happened. >> yeah, it was a bit of a messup on nbc's part. basically they aired a promo of her saying that she had won gold in her first time ever
. not even talking about using three architects. i think it is a wonderful example of how to really create tively use the freeway. all of the legal foundations in place for labor, for affordable housing, etc., i am comfortable with and i greatly appreciate mr. lee being a strong supporter. in the end, i believe the position the department takes is a correct one. however, market octavia -- having said that, i am very comfortable st. exceptional designed -- seeing exceptional designs. how we measure height and how we look at hickory alley, whatever. fees are being used for infrastructure improvements, the extension and the completion is in the spirit of using the money. it would -- it is perfectly justified. it is not just a self-serving thing. together with the idea of potentially having an agreement for hickory, at an innovative way which reinforces our market octavia it is developing. i think market octavia is one of the most exciting neighborhoods that is happening and i am really happy that we are -- we continue to support innovative design, good design, and neighborhood associations wi
in its most important task on its agenda this year. >> brown: the u.s. ambassador to the u.n. susan rice minced no words after russia and china once again vetoed a resolution that threatened sanctions on syria. >> one can only hope that one day before too many thousands more die, that russia and china will stop protecting assad and allow this council to play its proper role at center of the >> brown: it was the third time moscow and beijing have blocked u.n. efforts to make syrian president bashar al-assad stop the attacks on his own people. and this latest veto drew condemnation from country after country. >> mr. president today was an opportunity lost, history will show us price that the people in syria and beyond will have to pay. >> by exercising their veto today, russia and china are failing in their responsibilities as permanent members of the security council to help resolve the crisis in syria. >> ( translated ): in our judgment that resolution was best opportunity and perhaps the only opportunity to put an end to the mindless violence that affects the syrian arab republic. >> br
, we just want to let us innovate, let us do our thing. those areas of technology where entrepreneurs are allow today go forward are ones which would work great in countries around the world. that's all the opportunity you want. let innovation flourish. and to policymakers or lawmakers come down to this? do they enjoy seeing this? >> guest: they're very busy, and they do like coming down. it's tough getting them to las vegas. we think it's very important that policymakers see what the real world is like so they can make informed decisions when they're actually making votes and doing other things that are affecting, basically, how you can build products, what you can do, who you trade with, things like that. great american companies like apple and google and others are -- we have them here in the united states, and we have great international companies here. but it's working. the u.s. is the world leader. we want to keep it that way. but it's important we have the right policies. >> host: when we walked into the displays here, we saw your table, the cea table, and you had your legislat
shootings in u.s. history. hello i am judge jeanine pirro. this is part 2 of our special report on the colorado movie massacre. we are here with breaking news and we have with us adam housley. adam, are you with us? >> yes, june janeane. we are here to tell you about what's happening behind me. there have been a number of memorials over the last couple days the big one is taking place right now just begun after the president gave those words. he spoke for about 10 minutes or so talking about one story of incredible survival. we have heard a number of those stories. he talked about going to the hospital and giving people hugs and going here not just as the president but as a father and as a husband. of the people we met we know of three major operations takings place at the hospital a block or two from where we are standing that are continuing to help people that have some places in critical condition. the vigil has begun it has a number of different people speaking from a number of religious backgrounds as well as local leaders. there will be candles and tears and remembrances o
firml negotiating rights last u.s. partner saying it will be used as political campaign. parliament's approval of the support for fukushima daiichi plant in japan. >>> public support for nuclear energy in demonstrators held their latest post-fukushima protest aimed at pressuring the government to rally was 2011 disaster. >> reporter: they brave heat and humidity to come out in historic numbers. these protesters in tokyo are demand thousands of people are here to say no power. >> translator: nuclear power is too dangerous humans inred explosio is still otest after protest urging the government to stop using atomice and academy award winning musician. they told the crowd life and health are much more important than economic people came out today to lis their own government stop restarting nuclear plants and decommission them. things. when i think about my child and other children in fukushima, i cannot help butt shame for all japanese if another nuclear accident happens again. really angry. this is terrible politics that politicians play. >> reporter: government
traditional building facing the south side, i think it is phenomenal. not even talking about using three architects. i think it is a wonderful example of how to really create tively use the freeway. all of the legal foundations in place for labor, for affordable housing, etc., i am comfortable with and i greatly appreciate mr. lee being a strong supporter. in the end, i believe the position the department takes is a correct one. however, market octavia -- having said that, i am very comfortable st. exceptional designed -- seeing exceptional designs. how we measure height and how we look at hickory alley, whatever. fees are being used for infrastructure improvements, the extension and the completion is in the spirit of using the money. it would -- it is perfectly justified. it is not just a self-serving thing. together with the idea of potentially having an agreement for hickory, at an innovative way which reinforces our market octavia it is developing. i think market octavia is one of the most exciting neighborhoods that is happening and i am really happy that we are -- we continue to su
of the legislature? we will put less into deferral payment and we will use that money for non-k-12 services. we will use it for health services, child-care services. that is not what that money is for. this is more cuts to k-12 and just this week, by the way, we found out that our calculation was wrong so we will propose more cuts in mid-year. we have said so many times we cannot absorb these cuts and they keep getting bigger and bigger and bigger. with leadership and concurrence of our friends in the legislature. are they in a difficult position? they have to choose between services for poor people and services for poor kids in school, yes. our job is to make them make the right choice. as hard as we try, we have not done a good enough job or we have to admit we failed and say to my kids are the lowest priority. the lowest priority of the state, not the highest. we need to change. people need to engage in this and they need to know what is going on. this is so veiled and difficult. i am urging that we in our school district tried to make this as clear as possible which is tough. and find ways
and materials. >> laura, thank you for joining us. >> great to be with you. >> we are trying to let folks know what happened at this big nuclear security summit that was just in seoul, korea. how do you assess what happened there? >> i thought it was a really great moment of coming together of 58 global leaders looking at the various issues of nuclear security. this was a concept invented by president obama in his speech in product in 2009. the first was held in the u.s. in 2010. two years later, we have gathered even more leaders together to focus on the seriousness of the risk of terrorism, the vulnerability of nuclear material are on the world, the international cooperation it will take to secure that material and prevent it from coming into that hands of terrorists. >> so it is material as well as existing weaponry? >> that is right. it covers both sets of concerns. >> and then you take -- what level of know how it is concerned, how you put things together. >> that is right. >> in the u.s., we are concerned nowadays more worth -- correct me if i'm wrong. a suitcase bomb? >> and improvised
to afghanistan's future. >> that designation paves the way for the u.s. and afghanistan to maintain defense long aft u.s. troop withdrawal. secretary clinton is on her way to tokyo. in japan, she'll ask international donors to pledge their support to afghanistan. joining me on the phone from kabul is john wendell, a photographer and time magazine correspondent. how significant is this announcement? >> caller: hi. thanks for having me. i think secretary clinton's use of the word symbol is the keyword here. the enduring partnership was signed on may 2nd between the u.s. and afghanistan. the major non-nato ally announcement was part of that. the announcement, i think, is not so significant when it comes to the day-to-day of the war. what i think it is doing is helping lay the fears o afghanistan's elite that will be abandoned ahead of the 2014 u.s. withdrawal of nato forces and part of an effort to push the taliban back. i think the main reason for the announcement was so the u.s. can point to a concrete move showing its commitment ahead of the tokyo conference you mentioned tomorrow. as part of an
ten years when the u.s. first after september 11th invaded afghanistan. i don't know, some of you are too young to remember, but others of us might remember looking at our tv screens and seeing the pictures of these very fancy, new weapons that we had. this idea that we know had these precision weapons that would only target the people that we wanted to get and would not result in collateral damage. and it was almost a way to say to people, calmed down, don't be worried. we will be killing innocent people. so, i was worried because i don't have as sense that the latest and greatest new weapon is going to protect innocent people and went to afghanistan three weeks after the invasion with several other colleagues. it was before we even got into afghanistan on the border of pakistan that we found already people who would be considered collateral damage. the first young woman i met is somebody who sticks with me because she looked like my daughter. she was 13 years old. my daughter at that time was 13 years old. i felt an affinity with her and asked her if i could learn about her stor
embarrassment for nbc as well. tell us what happened. >> yeah, it was a bit of a messup on nbc's part. basically they aired a promo of her saying that she had won gold in her first time ever here at the olympics, 100 meter backstroke. i watched it. it was really an amazing race. she did so well. but that promo on nbc then aired right before the race itself. so anyone who tuned in would have actually knew what the result was before they could actually watch it. so there has been all this outrage and nbc, you're spoiling the olympics for people. and hash tag came up callcalled called #nbcfail and everybody is complaining about this. what is interesting to note is that if this had happened four years ago, tape delays wouldn't have become such an issue. in the world of social media, twitter and facebook, everyone is getting results instantaneously. so the whole delay is causing a real issue for so many people, but, suzanne, you can watch it live streamed on nbc's website. so that's one option. and another option is just to go on a twitter, facebook, social media diet. and the other is to come to lon
capabilities to secure our borders and first responders. u.s. customs and border protection began first looking at drums back in 2004, now cvp owns 10 ues aircraft. the systems have been used to surveilled drug smuggler tunnels, videos, burbridge, risk of flooding and assist with the deployment of national guard resources responding to local flooding. cdp has flown missions in support of the border patrol, texas rangers, u.s. service, fbi and others. the systems have become a force multiplier for military operations and for border security. however, we run the edge of the new horizon. using unmanned aerial systems within the homeland currently are 200 active certificates of operation issue i the federal aviation administration to over 100 different entities such as law enforcement department and academic institutions to fly drugs domestically. this map on the monitor shows the locations of coa recipients as at april 2012. the number of recipients since that time has in fact increased. the faa plans to select 65 cities around the country for the use of nongovernment euros this year and plans to
to use spectrum much more efficiently. >> was that technology developed in san diego? >> yes. also here is the debt. what are you display here? woody showing to members of congress and the staff? >> this demonstrates how 3g and next-generation mobile technology can improve people's lives. one of our projects -- a health care project and an education project. the health-care project -- this is a wireless monitoring ship that allows patients with congestive heart failure to monitor their health and their house daily. they can use in mobile application and take their blood pressure, their blood oxygen level, their heart rate, their weight -- and they can collect the data using the mobile app and transmit it to their nurses and doctor, who are listening on a daily basis. the doctors said and able to see the data. if they see a decline in the patient costs health, they will contact the patient immediately so that it prevents them from having to be readmitted to the hospital. >> do you see savings in health- care dollars with this? >> definitely. patients -- there are about 1 million people a
say chinese authorities aren't transparent about their spending. the u.s. and japan and other countries are concerned about china's military muscle. the chinese government has been more aggressive in its campaign to force the claim over disputed islands in the region. analysts say it is partly intended to keep other countries in check over the disputes. >>> analysts are sounding the alarm about the naval buildup. their annual white paper says recent actions by chinese authorities are a grave concern for east asia and the rest of the world. this year's report says china's defense budget increased by 30 times over the past 24 years. defense officials believe the growth is from building aircraft carriers and say chinese leaders are dispatching war ships more frequently to the south china sea and east china sea. the latter is home to the senkaku islands. which both china and taiwan claim. the wipe paper claims ownership. defense officials will submit the report to the cabinet and then release it to the public by the end of this month. public anger over the deployment of military a
condition. it was the worst mass shooting in the u.s. since the killings of 32 people at virginia tech five years ago. we'll have more on the store after the headlines. syrian rebels continue to make gains on the regime of bashar al-assad, seizing a number of border crossings with neighboring iraq and turkey. opposition fighters overrun government forces at two major crossings, including one controlling the vital trade route on the damascus to baghdad highway. meanwhile, the syrian government says the country's intelligence chief, hisham ikhtiyar, has died from injuries sustained in wednesday's bombing of a high- level meeting in damascus, making him the fourth assad regime insider to die in the attack. and it's the violence, the united nations is warning 1 million syrians are now believed to be internally displaced, double the previous estimate. the fighting continues in syria one day after russia and china vetoed a security council resolution threatening new sanctions on the syrian regime. russia and china say they took action over demands for the inclusion of penalties under chapter seve
executive arnie gundersen about the report and what it means for u.s. plants. then a look at serious operations in africa and how the united states rendered, tortured and discarded one innocent man from tanzania. and protests against the u.s. mining giant newmont are escalating in peru. five participants in those protests have been killed in the past week. a state of emergency has been declared. >> the government is mistaken if it thinks it is going to crash the justified cries of the people. >> we will speak with amy goodman in spain today, 75 years after the bombing of that city. all of that and more coming up. this is "democracy now!," democracynow.org, the war and peace report. i'm juan gonzalez. i am filling in for amy goodman. the u.s. and european union are calling for new sanctions on syria similar to those used against the gaddafi regime ahead of the nato attack on libya. at an international friends of syria gathering in paris, secretary of state clinton invoked the threat of chapter 7 under the u.n. charter, which ranges from economic embargos to military force. the news co
recognizing that most of us are, if you will pardon my saying this, a little on the older side. how can i get you all to understand what it is like to use a computer for our parents and for seniors who have never done it? i have a great way. go home and find a 14-year-old boy and ask him to play a video game. i have done this with both of my sons when they were younger, and it is an amazing experience. my kids will be playing a game, which i am total in not understanding at all, and my kids say, "jump," and i go, " how?" everything that is intuitive to them is completely foreign to me. the good news is i am at no risk of becoming addicted to video games. the last point i would like to make is that the environment is really changing rapidly. 10 years ago, if we had sat down and talk about seniors and technology, a lot of people would have wondered why seniors would want to use computers, but that has shifted. over the next few years, as all of us move toward being seniors, we will not be wanting technology. we will be demanding it. the field is going to change, and more and more people are goi
feet in height automatically requires conditional use authorization. so it's sort of a layered effect where you have both an ultimate envelope of 65 feet, but again any development between 40 feet and 65 requires your conditional use authorization. commissioner miguel: thank you, i just wanted that clarified so that everybody understood where the two numbers came from. i might, and i say that very definitely, might be more satisfied if you slipped in the fourth floor, and i say this not to knock off the sixth floor because some of the setbacks on the upper two floors could still work with the whole thing coming down. so slipping out something like the third or fourth floor and bringing it down so that the setbacks on the then remaining upper floors were there would start to satisfy me a little more. i still am in a situation as long as we're over the 40 foot of necessary and desirable, i am of the opinion, strictly personal, that 4,000 square foot penthouse is neither necessary or desirable and that if you did bring down a floor, that top level could be divided into several units and
on the building. yes, the architecture is slightly better than the previous iteration that was presented to us and the massing of the building is slightly smaller than the previous iteration, but this project does not substantially -- but this project is not substantially different or approved of the project two years ago. additionally, there are no benefits to this project, no benefits that make this project necessary or desirable. to hear the same argument for every housing to the lead based on your argument, i cannot support this project. i cannot support a continuing the project because the project sponsor does not seem to me interested in working with the community. i don't know why that is. maybe that has to be decided other places. as planning commissioners, looking at the threshold of conditional use, looking at the fact there are exceptions to the bulk limitations and the height and bulk district, a variance from the rear yard, all of the exceptions, this is not a code complying product to begin with. i think we are exercising our discretion. president fong: commissioner sugaya? commi
to be one held of a disappointment. that's all for us tonight. >>> from cnn world headquarters in atlanta, this is early start weekend. an unannounced visit to afghanistan and an impact for troop withdrawal. plus, like a scene from "jaws," the hunt is on to find the sharks before they claim a human life. >>> blame it on the meat. that's what one olympic coach is doing. is one team's diet behind their losses in key contests? >>> it is saturday, july 7th. good morning, everyone. i'm randi kaye. glad you are waking up with us. chances are after you turned on cnn you logged into your computer to do surfing and check your e-mail. come monday, it may not be possible. it turns out there's a nasty virus out there. hundreds of thousands of computers are affected around the world. that means you may not have internet access monday morning. the fbi plans to shut down services to fix it. the scope doesn't matter if you are one of the unlucky ones. what will you do without your internet if you lose it monday? how will you spend your time? can you remember what life was like without it? tweet me@randyk
could not get there. my colleague said that if anybody can see this, take a picture and send it to us. there is a man on the twenty fourth floor looking out the window with his camera. took a picture, looked at it, send it to us, we had it on the air and a couple of minutes. because of technology, because of things changing so rapidly. it is a brand new world. vicki, thank you for the importance of that network and everything else. thank you. next, i want to introduce you to a gentleman. he is tall, dark, handsome. sorry, that was me. wrong script. [laughter] you, too, right? it's your birthday, right? ok. in all seriousness, a gentleman by the name of dmitri is here. i want you to meet him. his name is dmitri belzer. he has worked in the disability community for years providing technology access for more than 30 years. trained as a sign language expert and interpreter, he established a death services program ast san francisco state university, provided support services for colleges. we don't call them disabled. they happen to have a disability. he joined pacific bell, helped organize
us four years to realize the error of our ways and move back here. it did the warriors 41 years. on a day when the city is excited about the basketball team coming back, we are thrilled to have the mayor here to help us open our san francisco office. thank you very much for all you have done. want to hand it over to you. [applause] >> congratulations. i wanted to come by. my staff let me know the background and history of this company, and i'm very excited for it and not only wish you success, but it is our success as well as the success of the city to have you here. you're so glad to join our friends at pg&e as well as the department of the environment. their staff. we have some past commissioners as well that have served in various capacities. we are excited about clean energy, and we are excited about the reason you started here. actually started back in virginia, but you came back to san francisco, and we are excited to have you here. the model you have about the ability to communicate with people, using the social media platform, and getting kind of a personal relationship
is cooling, we look at what the slowdown means for u.s. corporate earnings, and the global economy. >> susie: and one company is making a big push into china, marriott international, a look at its latest earnings and strategy. >> tom: that and more tonight on "n.b.r.!" >> tom: markets were clearly disappointed today the federal reserve does not seem ready to act right away to boost the economy. minutes from the fed's june meeting show only a few policy makers wanted to expand a bond buying program known as quantitative easing to lower interest rates and boost the economy. but as darren gersh reports this is now really a question of timing. >> reporter: the fed was not willing to give markets an immediate monetary fix, but the latest readings from its policy making committee show a couple more lukewarm reports on the labor market might change that. >> and if these employment reports are still weak like this last one, i think a strong case could be made for the fed to expand its balance sheet and try to support the economy more. so, at that point it will be clear that the recovery has stalled
recology for hosting us, joining the chamber, and small business leaders tonight. as elizabeth and mark pointed out, they knew our san francisco businesses had started celebrating early. one of the reasons is because san francisco small businesses can smell a party two weeks and dance. -- in a defense -- they can smelly party two weeks in advance. [laughter] they are fun to work with. during our most economically challenging times, it was small businesses that kept coming back. they were so resilience. as i stepped up to take on this responsibility as mayor, it clearly was on my wind -- mind to find some way to register our appreciation. small business by its name, sometimes you are thinking these are people and businesses isolated by themselves. but you are a big topic at city hall these days. you are big because we are getting more people to understand how it is that our small businesses are 50% of all the employees that are hired in our city. 50 2% of the revenue generated in our city. 52% of the revenue generated in our cities from small businesses. when you look at challenges, when
have with us tonight, mayor ed lee. as a city is a minister, he represented gavin newsom in defending this city's proclamation. and a new chapter in asian pacific american history when he was elected as the city's first asian-american mayor. ladies and gentlemen -- all right, join me in welcoming mayor edwin m. lee. [applause] you have your own crowded back there. the m. in your middle name stand s for ma. >> thank you all for coming. i'm glad to be here on the eighth time we've celebrated this, and want to give a thank- you for helping us put this on. thank you! and of course, i join here as part of an official city family. thank you for being here. he is joined by supervisors carmen chu, jane kim, and eric mar. our elected officials, jeff adachi, the public defender, the recorder assessor, hydra mendoza, and emily murase. we're also thankful for the chief of police, thank you. i would like to also acknowledges someone that has been a very special friend of mine, someone that has given me a lot of support and advice over the years. and also someone who has not missed one
. >> if the term is not sufficiently definite for you, wouldn't expert in that field help us figure that out? >> maybe so. but that assumes the foundational question, which is, is that important to your determination? our position is that is not. it is just a little. commissioner hayon: from my point of view, we have at least two declarations, ms. madison's and ms. lopez's declarations, which are fundamentally completely different stories of the same event. for me, i feel that i need some help in trying to figure out why there is such a wide discrepancy in these declarations of these witnesses, in terms of how they describe the events that took place. i think that an expert like miss lemmon could possibly be helpful. perhaps not. perhaps once we hear what she has to say, we will fill this does not apply to the witnesses that we have. but perhaps it will be helpful and will be relevant in helping us to decide which of these stories has more credibility. that, and of course cross- examination of the witnesses themselves. i certainly could see the need to have her testify. chairperson hur: that
use it in an identity theft in the future. >> cases have been reported in the least a dozen states in the country including right here in maryland. b.g.e. officials are taking stock of its performance after the storms last week. there's a lot to be learned from these last two weeks. >> we will be looking at the network and where are their danger trees, trees that are perhaps leaning in a bad position or limbs that may be broken and they come down on our lines. >> there could be more severe weather during the summer. >> sent by opening insights into what remains -- some by opening insights into what remains. kim dacey has more. >> today the department of public works will start making some system flow adjustments to protect the city water supply. in march, they discovered the potential break in the line in southwest baltimore. using high-tech equipment like the pipe diver and the special optical cable, now the dpw has to replace three sections of the 54-inch main. because of that, citizens are being asked to conserve water. >> please refrain from outside watering, car washing, power
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